Anagramming the World, Part III

We wrap up Anagramming the World Week here at The Basement Geographer with the final batch of continental maps reproduced using randomly generated anagrams ranging from weird to profane to surreal.  Today’s batch features anagrammed maps of the Americas and Oceania. Click on each map to enlarge to full size and enjoy! (Part I can…

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Anagramming the World, Part II

Anagramming the World Week continues here at The Basement Geographer with the second of three batches of continental maps reproduced using randomly generated anagrams ranging from weird to profane to surreal.  Today’s batch features anagrammed maps of Asia and Antarctica. Click on each map to enlarge to full size and enjoy! (Part I can be…

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Anagramming the World, Part I

The masses have spoken: visitors to this site really like anagrams (as well as giant fungi, and heavily polluted lakes). Last week’s anagram map of the Vancouver SkyTrain metro system garnered a huge amount of views over the past week-and-a-half (as well as those other two articles, particularly the latter which has already become the…

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2012 Vancouver SkyTrain Anagram Map

Surely by now in your Internet journeys you’ve come across the fantastic London Underground anagram map, the hilarious parody of Harry Beck’s iconic London Underground map that has been kicking around since at least 2006.  The concept is simply: all of the tube station and line names on the map have been replaced with anagrams. …

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Tawdry Toponyms: All About Ass

Source: A. Sim, http://www.flickr.com/photos/cbweather/5612627372/. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic licence. Ragged Ass Road is Yellowknife, Northwest Territories’ most famous street, and all because of its unique name. Located in the Old Town section of the remote city that dates back to the 1930s gold rush, it’s still a bit rustic looking today….

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Selling Telephones to Penguins: How a Website Glitch Created a New Antarctic Economy

For anyone wanting to obtain visual representation of international import/export data, whether for research or just for their casual interest, The Observatory of Economic Complexity is a fantastic tool for both researchers and the general public. Developed by Alexander Simoes and emanating from the MIT Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in association…

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The Island of Misfit Photos

Most users of image hosting sites such as Flickr and Panoramio who tag their photographs with geographic coordinates are aware enough of their locations to tag their imagery with the proper coordinates (or are at least savvy enough to buy cameras that automatically geotag their photos for them).  Anyone who’s closely browsed the maps on…

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A Unfortunate Turn of Phrase

Here’s a pithy thing I found while on a Google Street View hunt.  One can only imagine how many people have, at some point, driven along northern New South Wales’ bucolic Bruxner Highway west of Tenterfield for the first time only to perform a double take when coming across the signs at this road junction:…

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Testing Out Voice-Command Searches in Google Maps

It’s always fun to toy around with whatever new innovations pop up in the world in the world of Internet mapping. One of the newest changes introduced by Google Maps at the end of August is the integration of voice-command searches in Google Maps (well, at least for English speakers using Chrome). Voice searches have…

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