A Trip to Trout Lake

It only figures that on the heels of my friends’ trip to Washington’s abandoned Central Ferry Park last month, I wound up taking one of my own trips into an abandoned rural locale of the Pacific Northwest not long after. One of the perks of working in an archives is the trips you get invited…

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Exploring Central Ferry Park

About three weeks ago, two lifelong friends of mine, Lee Orr and Stefan Klopp, pooled their vacation time and hit the ever-stunning Palouse region of southeast Washington for a week of backroads photography and sightseeing. For Lee, a pro photographer and digital artist, it was the last chance to get away for the season and indulge…

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Following Up: An April 2012 Update on Previous Articles

It’s been a few months since our last follow-up post, so here are a few mini-updates and additional tidbits on some topics from previous articles (of which we have officially reached 400 today) here at The Basement Geographer: Varosha: Forever Trapped in 1974 (originally posted 27 August 2010): A report in the Turkish daily Milliyet on…

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The Dingo Fence

Australia is divided by sport (the Barassi Line) and by topography (the Great Dividing Range), but perhaps its most iconic division is a basic two-metre-high fence.  Basic, perhaps, by its construction (wire mesh extending 180 cm/6 ft high and 30 cm/1 ft deep), but certainly not by length: at 5 614 km (3 488 mi) in length,…

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Hydro Symbols of the Arrow Lakes

This past week, I spent a relaxing few days away from the computer, the Internet, the phone, the digital camera – those modern trappings that enrich/enrage us all. Edgewood, British Columbia is certainly a place where people can set their own pace and engage/withdraw from the world-at-large seemingly at will. A village of 230 or…

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Tonlé Sap

A few months ago, I wrote about the gradual shrinking of the ephemeral Lake Chad in north-central Africa. Today’s article visits another large ephemeral lake that is locally crucial (and under threat) both environmentally and economically, but has a much brighter outlook than Lake Chad. At a minimum surface area of 2 700 km2, no…

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Rural Aging in Japan and Population Implosion

The developed world (define that term how you will) is aging. We are living longer. We are having children later, and having fewer of them when we do. In the past three decades, we’ve seen countries arrive at the pivotal zero-percent population growth rate. The trend began in the eighties in Eastern Europe and spread…

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Mile Houses of the Cariboo Road

You may recall that about two months ago I was inspired by Tom Howder’s post at Twelve Mile Circle on sequentially-named towns in Massachusetts, leading me to write about the alphabetically-named towns along the Canadian National Railway in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Today, I’ll bring it a bit closer to my home with a look at a…

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Bawean: The Island of Women

With (at lowest count) 17 508 different islands, 922 of which are permanently inhabited, containing over 238 million people, Indonesia holds an incredible amount of cultural diversity within its confines. Take, for example, the small island of Bawean in the Java Sea, on which 77% of the population is female. Of 75 000 persons counted in the…

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