The Top 8 Best-Selling Music Singles Featuring Place Names

Music and place are inseparable. So many songs have been written about landscapes, countries, buildings, and cities that it’s impossible to look at a record sales chart without finding at least a handful of toponyms. As a geography site, it’s time we examine which toponomically-themed songs have embedded themselves into popular culture by looking at…

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Following Up: A September 2013 Update on Previous Articles

It’s been quite a while since our last follow-up post, so here are a few mini-updates and additional tidbits on some topics from previous articles here at The Basement Geographer: UVB-76: 30 Years of Radio Mystery (originally posted 26 December 2011): On 24 January of this year, the mysterious Russian shortwave radio ‘numbers’ station known of UVB-76…

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Norfolking Way: Counterinituitive Pronuniciation Clusters in England

The English language is in many ways a victim of its own success.  Being standardised in writing at such an early stage meant that centuries of changes in pronunciation in the Anglosphere have have gone unrepresented in modern English spelling. Centuries of pilfering and absorbing words from a myriad of languages have resulted in speakers…

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Christmas Islands Around the World

It’s June, which means it’s halfway to Christmas. Halfway, that is, unless you live in one of the numerous places around the world named for the holiday. Geody lists 171 places in its gazetteer with the word ‘Christmas’ in their name, including such places as Christmas Vlei, Namibia (a dry lake in the western portion…

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Centres of the World and Centres of the Universe

This article will alternate between using ‘Centre’ and ‘Center’ in location names depending upon the locales referenced. Forget your preconceptions that the centre of the Earth lies inside an incredibly dense, ultra-hot core thousands of kilometres below the planet’s surface, or that the universe is a giant homogeneic expanse with no discernable central point. The…

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New Ulster, New Munster, and New Leinster: Names for New Zealand That Didn’t Take

In our last post on 19th century comparative maps, you may have noticed this map from 1855, which not only included New Zealand in the Western Hemisphere but also labelled what we know today as the South Island ‘Middle Island’, giving the ‘South Island’ appellation to what we call Stewart Island or Rakiura (the smaller…

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