Counting Down the Largest Lake Islands in the World, Part I: #10-#6

Lists of the world’s largest islands can be found in pretty well any encyclopedia, world atlas, desktop reference book, or geography website. Lists of the world’s largest islands inside lakes, however, aren’t nearly as common in reference guides, generally being relegated to Wikipedia, WorldAtlas.com, or geo-oddity websites. Even if you’re a geo-oddity hunter, you probably…

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Same Name, Other Side of the Border (Part V: Africa)

This is part five of our seven-part Same Name, Other Side of the Border series. Congo (Democratic Republic of the Congo/Republic of the Congo) The multitude of places named Congo or Kongo take their name from the kingdom of Kongo, an empire in west-central Africa that existed from approximately 1390 in what is now the…

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Interrupted International Borders, Part II: Europe, Africa, and North America

Today, we finish off our look at countries that border other countries more than once thanks to the presence of an intervening country or water body (Part I can be found here).  Again, each of these examples could be their own article and then some; consider these more of a brief description of each border’s…

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Old Country-Code Top-Level Internet Domains Never Die, They Just Fade Away (Sometimes)

In the big, wide world of the Internet, there are essentially two types of top-level Internet domains (TLDs) in everyday usage (discounting the infrastructural .arpa).  There are generic domains with no specific geographic attachment (e.g., .com, .net, .org, .info, .mobi), and there are country-code domains assigned to individual countries and territorial entities based for the…

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The Congo Pedicle

For decades, the countries of Africa have had to deal with the artificially-imposed boundaries they have been confined to by the legacy of European colonialism; boundaries that slash across ethnic and cultural homelands, linguistic groupings, and geographic features. Most of these boundaries were simply lines of convenience. Some, however, were the result of drawn-out negotiation…

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