Same Name, Other Side of the Border (Part V: Africa)

This is part five of our seven-part Same Name, Other Side of the Border series. Congo (Democratic Republic of the Congo/Republic of the Congo) The multitude of places named Congo or Kongo take their name from the kingdom of Kongo, an empire in west-central Africa that existed from approximately 1390 in what is now the…

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Following Up: An April 2012 Update on Previous Articles

It’s been a few months since our last follow-up post, so here are a few mini-updates and additional tidbits on some topics from previous articles (of which we have officially reached 400 today) here at The Basement Geographer: Varosha: Forever Trapped in 1974 (originally posted 27 August 2010): A report in the Turkish daily Milliyet on…

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Orphaned Islands, Part II: The Arctic, Europe, and Africa

Today, we continue our look at archipelagos where one or two islands have been politically isolated from the rest of the group, creating initially artificial divisions in otherwise homogenous places that can eventually become quite real and pronounced over time.  Click here for Part I. Diomede Islands Source: D. Cohoe, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Diomede_Islands_Bering_Sea_Jul_2006.jpg. Licensed under the Creative…

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The Sad Saga of Equatorial Guinea

Those of you who paid any attention to the Women’s World Cup of football over the past month may have noticed that in and among the usual soccer suspects was tiny Equatorial Guinea, who made it to the 16-team tournament despite a national population of less than 700 000 people (Equatorial Guinea’s previously best-known international…

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