A Gallery of Contrasts Along International Borders

We may think of borders as merely invisible lines on maps, but over time these ‘imaginary’ lines can become very real indeed. Countries regulate (or fail to regulate) the usage of their lands in very different ways. US astronaut and former NASA Chief Scientist John Grunsfeld remarked earlier this year how the differences in land…

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Tornadoes Around the World

When tornadoes make the news, they tend to do so for all the wrong reasons, as we were reminded of earlier this week when an outbreak of anywhere between 40 and 120 tornadoes resulted in at least 39 fatalities and untold millions of dollars in damage across the mid-eastern United States (approximately the eastern portion…

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Interrupted International Borders, Part II: Europe, Africa, and North America

Today, we finish off our look at countries that border other countries more than once thanks to the presence of an intervening country or water body (Part I can be found here).  Again, each of these examples could be their own article and then some; consider these more of a brief description of each border’s…

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Capitals of Their Country, Not of Their Region

Ottawa. Pretoria. Ngerulmud. That’s right, Ngerulmud.  What do these three cities share in common?  Well, for one, they’re all national capitals (Ngerulmud, if you’re wondering, has been the capital of the west Pacific island nation of Palau since 2006).  Even more uniquely, they’re cities which are capitals of their entire country but not of the…

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Google Sightseeing: Abandoned Stadiums of Europe, South America, and Africa

Last week, The Basement Geographer featured a post on the largest imploded buildings in history, one of which was the famous Kingdome in Seattle, a multi-purpose sports stadium that barely existed for a quarter of a century.  Not all abandoned or outmoded stadia get destroyed, however.  Some are just left to sit.  And sit.  and sit….

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Ur, the Oldest Continent?

As we know, the number of actual continents varies widely depending upon your definition of ‘continent’.  The basic concept, however, is (relatively) uniform; a large independent land mass considered too big to be a mere island. Over time, the number of continents grows or shrinks depending upon where the various tectonic plates of the planet…

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Google Sightseeing: Catch A Fire With Google Maps

Google Maps is on fire! Or at least it seems that way, considering the number of raging fires Google imagery has captured over the years. In my latest post at Google Sightseeing, you’ll get to see some of the fires caught by Google imagery, either from satellite or from Street View. This post captures a…

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