Elements Named for Places

As schoolchildren, we are all exposed to the periodic table of the elements in our science textbooks and on the walls of our chemistry classrooms.  This organised display of the chemical elements – the pure chemical substances that are the building blocks of all molecules – ingrains the names, symbols, and atomic weights of the…

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Following Up: An April 2012 Update on Previous Articles

It’s been a few months since our last follow-up post, so here are a few mini-updates and additional tidbits on some topics from previous articles (of which we have officially reached 400 today) here at The Basement Geographer: Varosha: Forever Trapped in 1974 (originally posted 27 August 2010): A report in the Turkish daily Milliyet on…

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Interrupted International Borders, Part II: Europe, Africa, and North America

Today, we finish off our look at countries that border other countries more than once thanks to the presence of an intervening country or water body (Part I can be found here).  Again, each of these examples could be their own article and then some; consider these more of a brief description of each border’s…

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For the Win: Sports Teams With Maps in Their Logos

As a geographer and as a sport fan, I very much appreciate it when the two comes together inside of a team crest or logo, especially when maps are incorporated into the emblem. I’m not counting league or governing body logos, which regularly include maps in them to demonstrate the area their jurisdictions cover; purely team…

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Border Bonanza

It appears that India and Bangladesh are finally trying to solve the matter of the infamous Cooch Behar enclave cluster – 106 tiny pieces of Indian land lying on the Bangladeshi side of the border, and 92 pieces of Bangladeshi land lying on the Indian side of the border, often embedded within each other. A…

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Varosha, Forever Trapped in 1974

The island of Cyprus remains divided 36 years after Turkey invaded and captured the northern 37% in response to a Greece-backed coup d’état, splitting the northern half off into the internationally-unrecognised Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. Despite numerous efforts to reunify the country, there does not appear to be an end to the dispute coming…

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