Google Sightseeing: The Crowsnest Pass

Those of you who read last autumn’s two-part article (Part I, Part II) on the various tragedies of Canada’s Crowsnest Pass may be interested in the Google Sightseeing post that goes along with it, which was posted today. While touching on some of the tragic history of the pass, the GSS post more focused on…

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Tragedies of the Crowsnest Pass, Part II

For Part I, click here. Crowsnest Lake, near the summit of Crowsnest Pass. Source: M. Rogers, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crowsnest_pass.jpg. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licence. In this 78 km (48 mi) corridor split between the Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, over 400 people were killed in various explosions, fires, and landslides…

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Tragedies of the Crowsnest Pass, Part I

Crowsnest Lake, near the summit of Crowsnest Pass. Source: M. Rogers, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crowsnest_pass.jpg. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licence. In a country known for its mountain scenery, the Crowsnest Pass corridor between British Columbia and Alberta manages to stand out as one of Canada’s most scenic mountain destinations. Contained within its gorgeous…

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Odds and Ends: Landlocked Lighthouses, Fun With AutoStitch

The Lone Lighthouse in Alberta There was an interesting story in the news this morning about the condemnation of Alberta’s only lighthouse. A landlocked prairie-and-plains landscape such as Alberta isn’t exactly laden with lighthouses and other nautical beacons, so the loss of this unique is seen as tragic by many. This is not the most…

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Milk River: Under Eight Flags

When one looks back to Spain’s colonial empire in the Americas, one usually thinks of its possessions that encompasses Mexico, Central America, and South America.  Maybe old California and Texas, or its Caribbean possessions such as Cuba, the Dominican Republic, or Puerto Rico spring to mind.  Canada’s Prairie Provinces don’t exactly scream out ‘Spain’ to…

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Following Up: An April 2012 Update on Previous Articles

It’s been a few months since our last follow-up post, so here are a few mini-updates and additional tidbits on some topics from previous articles (of which we have officially reached 400 today) here at The Basement Geographer: Varosha: Forever Trapped in 1974 (originally posted 27 August 2010): A report in the Turkish daily Milliyet on…

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Google Sightseeing: Landslide!

History shows us that you can build all the dams and retaining walls you want, but when the side of a mountain collapses above you, the mountain always wins.  The world is covered in the deep scars of major landslides and landslips.  In my latest article at Google Sightseeing, we look at a few of…

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Google Sightseeing: Ghosts of the Palliser Triangle

The Palliser Triangle is the driest region of Canada, encompassing southeastern Alberta and southeastern Saskatchewan. It can be very hard to conduct agriculture here, even in the fertile Canadian Prairies, thanks to the arid conditions. Many moved to the region in the early part of the 20th century only to find that they couldn’t make…

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