Mapping My Spam

I have to admit, I’m fascinated by the sheer amount of spam comments this site gets. Fortunately, thanks to the site’s settings, none of it actually makes it through to the page you see. But where does it come from? Cursory glances at the moderation list seem to show it coming from the same dozen…

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Selling Telephones to Penguins: How a Website Glitch Created a New Antarctic Economy

For anyone wanting to obtain visual representation of international import/export data, whether for research or just for their casual interest, The Observatory of Economic Complexity is a fantastic tool for both researchers and the general public. Developed by Alexander Simoes and emanating from the MIT Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in association…

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Google Sightseeing: Street View Competitors

I grew up in the West Kootenay, a unique region of Canada where both French and Russian are taught in the public school system as second languages of instruction thanks to the tens of thousands of people who descend from the thousands of Russian Doukhobors who arrived in the region between 1908 and 1912.  I…

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The Degree Confluence Project

Lines of latitude and longitude may merely be ‘imaginary’ lines running around the Earth, but they are indispensable to us as a society.  Not only have the geographic coordinates provided by the intersections of these lines become our basic method of denoting locations, but the lines themselves are attractions: the 180th meridian that forms the…

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The Island of Misfit Photos

Most users of image hosting sites such as Flickr and Panoramio who tag their photographs with geographic coordinates are aware enough of their locations to tag their imagery with the proper coordinates (or are at least savvy enough to buy cameras that automatically geotag their photos for them).  Anyone who’s closely browsed the maps on…

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A Quick Look at MigrationsMap.net

You may remember the post here last month on international population pyramids, which used great looking pyramids produced by Martin De Wulf at PopulationPyramid.net. If you haven’t read the post, you’ll definitely want to visit his site, which has does a fantastic job of visualising demographics for every country and major region on the planet…

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Testing Out Voice-Command Searches in Google Maps

It’s always fun to toy around with whatever new innovations pop up in the world in the world of Internet mapping. One of the newest changes introduced by Google Maps at the end of August is the integration of voice-command searches in Google Maps (well, at least for English speakers using Chrome). Voice searches have…

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Internet Browser Use by Country

One website I enjoy visiting every few months or so is StatCounter’s Global Stats page, just to look at the various trends in differences in the way people from different countries browse the Internet. It’s a rather telling indication of how well marketing works in various countries, and it’s been rather interesting to see the…

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Breaking News: Haida Gwaii Merges Into One Island

In a feat of extreme terraforming, Haida Gwaii, the large archipelago off the coast of British Columbia, Canada has morphed into one giant island, at least according to the latest Google Maps update. Evidently there’s been some Dutch-style polder reclamation of the continental shelf I’ve been unaware of. That or a polygon digitisation error. Okay,…

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Jaboatão dos Guararapes (Or, How to Misplace a City of 700 000 People)

As I began writing up a new post for Google Sightseeing yesterday, I began with (naturally) a visit to Google Maps to grab some screen captures. Within about two seconds of beginning to zoom in to the target area, I had a strange feeling that something was off, don’t ask me why. So, I paused…

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