Tilt-Shift Photography Week, Part II

Tilt-shift photography is a methods by which selective camera movements are used to place the camera’s focus on a specific portion of the image. The result often produces an effect that makes the scene in the image appear as if it was a model built in miniature. With the advent of digital photography and image manipulation software enabling selective blurring, tilt-shift photography and tilt-shift faking have exploded in popularity. Over the course of this week, we’ll be showing a number of tilt-shifted photos and videos of locations from around the world (Part I can be found here). Today, it’s the second part of Tilt-Shift Week, in which we look at landscapes captured in faux-miniature via amazing tilt-shifted videos.

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We begin with a video capturing everyday scenes in New York, The Sandpit by Sam O’Hare. It’s the very first tilt-shift video you see when typing ’tilt-shift’ into Google’s video search engine, and there’s a reason for that – it’s mesmerising. (For more of his tilt-shift work, watch Coachelletta, a video capturing scenes from the 2010 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival).

The Sandpit from Sam O’Hare on Vimeo.

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Fershad Irani captures more hustle bustle in Little Big City, a tilt-shift of Hong Kong.

Little Big City – Hong Kong Tilt Shift from Fershad Irani on Vimeo.

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Speaking of Asian city-states, you may have a hard time believing the scenes Keith Loutit’s The Lion City are not composed entirely of scale models, but rest assured that this is indeed Singapore.

The Lion City from Keith Loutit on Vimeo.

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Loutit has made other tilt-shift timelapses as well, including this collaboration with Jarbas Agnelli called The City of Samba, depicting Rio de Janeiro during Carnaval 2011.

The City of Samba from Jarbas Agnelli on Vimeo.

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Tristan Greszko takes a Pink Floyd-infused journey through the wintry terrain of western Wyoming in A Tiny Day in the Jackson Hole Backcountry, which captures extreme and backcountry skiers in miniature. Vimeo was impressed enough by the film to exhibit it at their showcase at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival this year. One can only imagine what Warren Miller would think of this.

A Tiny Day in the Jackson Hole Backcountry from Tristan Greszko on Vimeo.

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For those interested in H2O of the unfrozen variety, Dean Crilly made this tiltshift of stunning Sydney Harbour, featuring obligatory shots of the Harbour Bridge and Opera House.

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Stu Kennedy shot Tilt Shift Lincoln UK entirely on a smartphone.

Tilt Shift Lincoln UK – KakePipe.com from Stu Kennedy on Vimeo.

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Four Creative Digital Media students from the Institute of Technology, Blanchardstown, Ireland created this film as part of their Tilt-shift Dublin project. Everything in this video is digitally manipulated using no special lenses.

Tilt-shift Dublin from Stephen Duffy on Vimeo.

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This tilt-shift timelapse goes ‘in, around, and above’ the megalopolis of Tokyo, including an all-important nighttime shot.

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Finally, we end with a bit of a mystery. We’re not sure where this footage was taken, but this video entitled Forest: Tilt Shift Effect is a terrific collection of woodland scenery, flowing streams and waterfalls (which are always fantastic, but even moreso when tilt-shifted), and countryside ruins.

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